Rangers Violence Began In Late 17th Century, Says Uefa

17-06-08

THE violence at the Uefa Cup final began much earlier than was thought, probably in the late 17th century, officials said last night.

Uefa said the ring-leaders included King William of Orange and his horse

A Uefa investigation has revealed last month's violent scenes in Manchester were directly related to tensions arising from the Battle of the Boyne, which took place near the east coast of Ireland in 1690.

It is now believed the conflict was sparked not by a faulty big-screen television, but by a series of marginal differences over the correct method of worshipping Jesus.

Uefa said the violence then continued on and off for another 180 years until it was formalised with the establishment of Rangers Football Club in 1872.

Jean-Marie Le Blanc, Uefa's head of riots, said: "The violence in Manchester has deep, complex and incredibly stupid roots.

"It seems to based on an entrenched hostility towards Papal doctrine and an insatiable lust for the blood of 'fenians'."

He added: "If we want to prevent this kind of violence we must establish a single, agreed method for the worship of Jesus across the continent of Europe.

"Oh yeah, and booze – don't give them any booze."

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